Classic Lyric Arts Celebrates Fall Benefit Gala

The Kosciuszko Foundation in New York on Thursday, November 8th was the scene of Classic Lyric Arts Fall Benefit Gala. Glenn Morton, President, and Artistic Director, graciously welcomed the audience to a wonderful evening of young opera artists. “Classic Lyric Arts (CLA) is a nonprofit organization that supports the training of young artists in the field of opera, offering immersive programs each summer in France and Italy.” Glenn Morton spoke of the tremendous importance of these programs and how they influence the young singers as a catalyst for creation.

Singers from Classic Lyric Arts with Artistic Director Glenn Morton. Photo by Yifu Chien

There are in the program quotes that best describe going to France and Italy to prepare for a career in singing. Each year, Classic Lyric Arts offers about a dozen students a 3-week intensive training program focused exclusively on French opera and song. “The French sing more through their words than through their music. The singer becomes a painter, describing a landscape, suggesting an emotion, one must use the entire palette of colors of the voice.” Michel Sénéchal Co-Founder of Classic Lyric Arts France (1927-2018)

CLA Italy trains 25 singers in the “bel canto” traditions and techniques of singing in Italian. Ubaldo Fabbri, principal coach of CLA Italy, noted that “The great singers who become true legends are, not by coincidence, those who have impeccable diction, one that is intrinsically connected to their vocal technique.”

Gaspare Pacchierotti, castrato, (1740-1821) said: “Our language is so melodic that when it is pronounced precisely, its practically sung.”

The program began with “Pace, pace, mio dolce tesoro” from Mozart’s (1756-1791) Le Nozze di Figaro. The singers holding each other, some in whisper, some in trepidation, some in confusion, stolen kisses, misplaced vows, unfounded jealousies and ultimately expressions of true love and forgiveness.

The young singers were an ensemble in upheaval, disorientation and happy tears of harmony. Chantal Brundage, Sarah Bacani, Aleea Powell, Melanie Dubil, Leah Israel, Travis Benoit, Fernando Cisneros, Ari Bell, Yongjae Lee, with Mina Kim as the excellent accompanist. They were never Stepford wives in their perfection of voice and movement, but happy, gleeful youth, performing Mozart with truth and ardor.

Taicheng Li, tenor and Stephanie Guasch, soprano (L’amico Fritz). Photo by Yifu Chien

Next was the Cherry duet from Pietro Mascagni’s (1863-1945) L’amico Fritz. According to the program notes, “Fritz, is a wealthy landlord, determined to being a bachelor who meets Suzel the daughter of one of his tenants. As they are harvesting, she and Fritz begin to fall in love, while enjoying the abundance of Springtime.” Stephanie Guasch as Suzel and Taicheng Li as Fritz with Lochlan Brown as the pianist. Pietro Mascagni’s gentle, lyrical opera is quite a contrast to the mega-hit Cavalleria Rusticana, but it is equally resourceful in its sweetness and beauty. Guasch and Li are following a special line of lyrical singers. Recommended listening tenors, Ferruccio Tagliavini, Beniamino Gigli, Tito Schipa, Luciano Pavarotti and their female partners left us with enchanted recordings that will live forever. Ms. Guasch has a lovely soprano, never forced and able to negotiate the upper reaches with elegant yearning and awakening. Taicheng Li sports a fine tenor that showed the hearts awakening and yearning. Later on, the duet ends with almost stratospheric pianissimi at loves blooming. It ended before that happened. Nonetheless, it was a joy to hear it once more. I remember seeing “Fritz” at the wonderful Amato Opera on the Bowery and recall two chirping man-made birds singing along. It is such a gorgeous duet.

Classic Lyric Arts Singers. Photo by Yifu Chie

“Soave sia il vento” from Cosi fan tutte by W.A. Mozart was sweetly sung by Sarah Bacani, Rosario Hernandez and Ari Bell with Marianna Vartikyan as the pianist. Mozart’s group of duets, trios, and ensembles always enter the heart and mind with eagerness and they were a joyful blend. Don Alfonso Rosario Hernandez, laughs at the two-faced escapades of women, deliciously and devilishly sung by Sarah Bacani and Ari Bell.

“Venti scudi” by Gaetano Donizetti’s (1797-1848) in Elisir d’amore has Nemorino (Ganson Salmon) desperate for money to buy the famous elixir of love that will assure the affection of Adina, the girl he longs for, agrees to join the army for Venti Scudi (Twenty pennies). His braggart bellicose rival Sergeant Belcore makes him an offer “he dare not refuse.” Ganson Salmon has a lyric tenor voice that carries well and has additional resonance in the upper reaches. This duet offers tenorial opportunities to really shine and Mr. Salmon by virtue of a good technique did just that. Xiaomeng Zhang took advantage of his foolish rival in some strong baritonal outbursts which added to the fun. Nemorino is always endearing and seemingly naive and Belcore is always self-assured and cynical. The blending and clashing of these two rivals for Adina is in its own way heartwarming. Required listening-Venti Scudi by Enrico Caruso and Giuseppe De Luca in 1919. Caruso’s voice darkened in his later years and he “lightened” it for Nemorino. Sadly, on December 11th, 1920 Enrico Caruso suffered a throat hemorrhage at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in Elisir d’amore and the curtain came down after Act One. The greatest of tenors sang three times more at the Metropolitan Opera, his final performance being in La Juive December 24, 1920. He died in Naples, age 48, on August 2, 1921. The whole world mourned.

Xiaomeng Zhang, baritone, and Ganson Salmon, tenor (L’elisir d’amore). Photo by Yifu Chien

The program ended part one with two alumni reminiscing, tenor Ganson Salmon-Italy 2017 and Xiaomeng Zhang who gave it two thumbs up. The proof lay in the Italianate interplay in Venti scudi. In order to be more Italian in his interpretations, the great and sacred Bronx born American baritone Leonard Warren studied with Italian Baritone  Giuseppe De Luca.(in NYC) Warren died on stage at the Met in La Forza del Destino in 1960. He is a legend and an immortal. The critics noticed the tremendous difference in his singing from the Italianate studies with De Luca.

Part two of the program opened with the iconic “Au fond du temple saint” from The Pearl Fishers by Georges Bizet (1838-1875). Recently it was sung by Andrea Bocelli and baritone Bryn Terfel on PBS. Zurga and Nadir two pearl fishers in love with the same woman. Both are torn by their desire for Leila the Princess of Brahma. Even with Enrico Caruso, Giuseppe De Luca, and Frieda Hempel, the original 1916 production won critical praise and the”opening night” gala was a major social event-it was gone by the next season and did not return till a few years ago. Tenor Beniamino Gigli’s recording with Giuseppe De Luca of this duet is a classic. Enrico Caruso’s 1904 recording of Nadir’s aria “Mi par d’udir ancora”(Caruso made another “Darker” recording of this aria in 1916) was played in Woody Allen’s film Match Point other great interpreters were Beniamino Gigli, and Corsican tenor Tino Rossi. Each one gives the listener a learning experience. Zachary Goldman has a sweet lyric tenor that eases its way into darker territory with some strong outbursts. Sunyeop Hwang has a pleasing baritone that rang out in the dramatic portions and caressed in the strength of their friendship.

Next the religious lust combo of the “Te deum” from Giacomo Puccini’s masterpiece (1858-1924)Tosca. (1900) Still current with the “casting couch” but one must remember the ruthless, evil Scarpia is a man of sophistication and charm. I saw baritone Tito Gobbi in 1965 as Scarpia with the legendary Renata Tebaldi, his voice and performance haunt me still. Running a feather on Tebaldi’s back at the Palazzo Farnese and his entrance in the Church was frightening. His moderate sounding voice became huge when he made his entrance, he made you jump out of your seat in the theatre. Charles Laughton’s unexpected entrance in the Barretts of Whimple Street had everyone jump with fear. Those are things that must be learned like in cooking, a dollop of ricotta is not a large tablespoon, so too with singing.

Fernando Cisneros, baritone and Chantal Brundage, soprano (Le Nozze finale). Photo by Yifu Chien

Baritone Fernando Cisneros is the handsome seducer and when I saw him climb the stairs to get onstage, he was already Scarpia. Scarpia could not focus on the “Te deum” since he had a dual purpose to his overt religious spirit. It was heat for Tosca, the sign of the cross was a blessing to his steed loins to find a new rider, Tosca, and to rid her of her lover, his soon to be prisoner Mario Cavaradossi. Tosca was the lamb to be on the plate for Baron Scarpia, Chief of Police at the Palazzo Farnese. Travis Benoit and the chorus sang fervently and Mina Kim was the spirited conductor and pianist. The choristers who passed by earlier sang in earnest. The proximity of singers and audience made us all part of the experience.

The Septet from the Tales of Hoffmann by Jacques Offenbach (1819-1880) is described thusly, “Hoffmann has agreed to forfeit his shadow, his reflection, his essence, for his lover, the courtesan of Venice, Giuletta. She, in turn, abandons him for another.” The Septet, Blair Cagney, Daniela Magura, Zachary Goldman, Ganson Salmon, Sunyeop Hwang and Ari Bell with Cherie Roe as the dynamic accompanist. I suggest the Tales of Hoffmann’s 1951 film by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger whose hit about ballet in” The Red Shoes”  is now an iconic classic. This film version of Hoffmann is magical, grotesque and passionate and deserves its cult immortality. Filmmakers George Romero and Martin Scorsese were profoundly affected by this film. Each would rent it at the same record store and knew the other had it. City Opera tenor Robert Rounseville stars as Hoffmann and many notables of ballet and opera provide other voices – highly recommended. Sir Thomas Beecham is the conductor. Ballet star Robert Helpmann is Hoffmann’s “sworn enemy.” Ballet dancer Moira Shearer is Olympia, Ann Ayars is Giuletta and Leonide Massine gives a haunting balletic sequence as well. A must see!

Gran pezzo concertato from Il Viaggo a Reims by  Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868) “On their way to Reims for the coronation of Charles X of France, a group of European aristocrats, officers and a poetess (Lochlan Brown – conductor, Mina Kim Pianist) prepare to attend the royal festivities.” The entire company was outstanding. Victoria Policht and her lovely soprano were especially noteworthy. The cast shined and brought the light of art and music to all of us. They were Rachel Querreveld, Stephanie Guasch, Melanie Dubil, Emily Hanseul Park, Shan Hai, Yue Huang, Travis Benoit, Taicheng Li, Nathan Seldin, Fernando Cisneros, and Ari Bell. Each one a brilliant jewel on this musical necklace.

The finale, honoring the centenary of the late Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990 ) conductor and composer. “Make our Garden Grow” from Candide. Pangloss the world’s greatest philosopher declares that “We live in the best of all possible worlds.” The singers here were Rachel Querreveld, Bela Albett, Rosario Hernandez, Travis Benoit, Nathan Seldin, Ari Bell, chorus and Jonathan Heaney, conductor and pianist.   

The great Leonard Bernstein is buried in Brooklyn’s Greenwood Cemetery not far from our home in Carroll Garden’s South Brooklyn. The people on the street applauded his funeral hearse in Brooklyn since he composed West Side Story, Candide and On the town. Louis Moreau Gottchalk, a favorite of Bernstein, is also at Greenwood and the Pantano family! l will be in great company!

We were happy to attend the reception and to see so many singers and friends from the world of opera. The Gerda Lissner Foundation with Stephen De Maio as President received special thanks for supporting tonight’s gala. Cornelia Beigel, Gerda Lissner Secretary, was in attendance as well as contributors Alfred and Christine Palladino, Maestro Eve Queler, composer Philip Hagemann, Vocal Programs Joy Ferro, International Concerts Diana Corto and writer Meche Kroop were some of the friends and opera lovers present.

Artistic Director Glenn Morton. Photo by Yifu Chien

Glenn Morton, Artistic Director spoke to the singers at the concerts’ end and one felt the devotion that he inspired in the young singers. Through him, they enter the journey of the beauty of opera and the tranquil and exciting world it promotes in hearts and souls of their audiences.

We thank Glenn Morton President and Artistic Director, John Hunter, Vice President and Board Chairman, Alan Frankel, Secretary, Charles Perrier Treasurer, and Kathryn Stone. This evening will long live in cherished memory. Some “before the holidays” fun and a very gratifying look towards the future with such an abundance of young fresh talent!

Opera Index Presents Annual Membership Buffet & Recital

On Wednesday, November 7th, Opera Index presented their Annual Membership Buffet & Recital at The Community Church of New York in Murray Hill. It was a mild breezy evening and everyone came in with a smile because these events provided great food and peerless singing. The auditorium was soon filled up and aided by Joseph Gasperec, Executive Director and Jane Shaulis Metropolitan Opera mezzo and President of Opera Index. She began the program with pride in the accomplishments of Opera Index and its mentoring so many successful young singers over the years.

Jane Shaulis & Joseph Gasperec (Opera Index)
Photo by Judy Pantano

 

The recital opened with “Dich teure halle” from Wagner’s Tannhäuser by soprano Helena Brown. The darkness in the sound of her voice goes right up to brilliant highs and is quite thrilling. The triumphant quality of her voice greatly enhanced the thrill of the endless pouring of Wagnerian gold offered in this amazing piece. Ms. Brown is in good hands and is ready for the big time.

Michael Fennelly, Hubert Zapiór, Xiaomeng Zhang, Jane Shaulis, William Guanbo Su, Felicia Moore & Helena Brown. Photo by Judy Pantano

The second awardee was baritone Xiaomeng Zhang who sang “Vy mne pisali” from Tchaikovsky’sEugene Onegin. Zhang sang with elegant lyricism and with Russian melancholy. He sang it in Russian with outbursts from Onegin’s somewhat ambiguous nature. Zhang caught the mood and spirit of the piece and sang it with exuberant spirit. Dmitri Hvorotovsky, of blessed name, who was a great Onegin, would smile in opera heaven, knowing that such dedication and love is making an Onegin for future generations.

“Vous qui faites l’endormie” from Faust by Gounod was sung by bass William Guanbo Su. His laugh was quite the thing and Satan relished the mischief’s he was doing. The thing one must remember is that despite the devil’s spirited laughter, he is pure evil. Mr. Su was able to enchant and captivate his audience with his rich voice and made us willing participates in his devilish schemes. Well done, bravo! See Tonight we sing a 1953 film (About the life of Impressario Sol Hurok) starring the great Ezio Pinza as Russian bass Fyodor Chaliapin for whole episodes of Faust with Roberta Peters, tenor Jan Peerce and Pinza as Mephistopheles.

Stephen Heiden, Linda Howes & Stephen Phebus Photo by Judy Pantano

“Est gibt ein Reich” from Ariadne auf Naxos” by Richard Strauss was exuberantly sung by soprano Felicia Moore, who has a lovely, shimmering frolicsome top voice, caressing legato, climbing scales, expanding trills and a radiant upper extension so vital to the music of Strauss.This Strauss was a tantalizing bit of future glory! I thought of the great soprano Eileen Farrell, who married a cop, sang jazz and settled in Staten Island. What a glorious voice. Thanks for evoking the thought, Felicia Moore.

Cesare Santeramo & Dr. Robert Campbell
Photo by Judy Pantano

Last but not least, was the rising Polish baritone Hubert Zapiór, who sang the spirited “Largo al factotum” from Rossini’s Il Barbiere di Siviglia. I have heard this aria many times and I vividly recall my mentor and beloved voice teacher Bertha Lang playing the recording sung by the immortal American baritone Lawrence Tibbett and teaching it to me phonetically. I sang it at age 13 on The Ted Mack Amateur Hour and for the great bandleader (Rhapsody in Blue) Paul Whiteman on his coast to coast television show in 1949. I loved singing it and ironically Lawrence Tibbett (1896-1960) who also was a film star, sang the role only once in his lifetime. I got to see Tibbett when he replaced Ezio Pinza in Fanny on Broadway in 1956. I have seen Mr. Zapiór before and was impressed with the nobility of his voice but never saw him in such an exuberant piece. I loved his contrasting “Col Cavaliere” with “Colla Donnetta” and his mock soprano fun singing. His precision was seemingly at ease and the precision was perfect. By the time this tour de force was over, the audience was wild with enthusiasm. I had tears in my eyes to hear it so beautifully rendered. I became the 13 year old boy baritone hearing Tibbett’s recording for the first time. Bravo Figaro-bravo Zapiór.

Marion Schumann, Philip Hagemann, Penny Lepka Knapp. Photo by Judy Pantano

Michael Fennelly was the brilliant and enthusiastic accompanist for this group of singers. He is as good as it gets, and being a Californian, he brings pianistic sunshine to all.

Jane Shaulis announced some surprise encores. Helena Brown sang a riveting “Since My Man’s Gone” from Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess and used both upper and lower reaches of her voice to get us all emotionally entwined in her profound grief. Once again, like in Elisir d’amore I shed “Tre Furtivi lagrimi” at least three tears. Powerful stuff!  

I heard the great bass Ezio Pinza sing “Some Enchanted Evening” from South Pacific at Lewisohn Stadium and again at Madison Square Garden in 1951. William Guanbo Su sang it beautifully, without the pianissimo ending. It is such a wonderful song and the richness of Su’s basso at such a young age was very satisfying and romantic.

Cavaliere Edward Jackson, Doris Keeley & Ursula Brown. Photo by Judy Pantano

Now that our ears were filled with the sound of beautiful music, it was time for a delicious dinner provided by the members.

John David Metcalfe & Ken Benson
Photo by Judy Pantano

Judy and I lived in Murray Hill in 1965-6. It was with renewed joy that we returned for such a splendid evening thanks to the folks at Opera Index.

It was nice to share some time with legendary Met mezzo Rosalind Elias, soprano Jane Marsh, artists managers Ken Benson, Robert Lombardo, and Michael Rosen; George Voorhis, Mark Moorman, Jesse Walker, Robert Steiner, Faith Pleasanton, Janet Stovin, Ellen Godfrey, Cavaliere Eddie Jackson, resplendent in a black velvet cape, the elegant Cesare Santeramo and Dr. Robert Campbell, looking well in his wonderful red leather coat, Linda Howes and Maestros Stephen Phebus and Eve Queler, Ursula Brown, Doris Keeley, William Goodhue, Jane Le Master, the brilliant opera lecturer Lou Barrella, composers Philip Hagemann and Penny Leka Knapp (Fruitcake) antiquarian horologist John David Metcalfe and famed MetOpera standee Brooklynite Lois Kirschenbaum, now immortalized in a recent film documentary.

Former Met Mezzo Rosalind Elias, Lou Barrella,
Guest, & Nino Pantano. Photo by Judy Pantano

Three special guests of Phil Hagemann and Murray Rosenthal were Marion Schumann, Mary Pierce and Marion’s sister Margaret, all from the Pegasus Opera Company in Brixton, London, England. They presented two of Phil’s performances that were well received and the women enjoyed the festivities at our Membership recital and dinner. Each and every one a star and all friendly – not distant stars.

Mary Pierce, Marion Schumann &
Philip Hagemann. Photo by Judy Pantano

Thank you Jane Shaulis for being our congenial host, you truly are “the hostest with the mostest!”

 

Gerda Lissner Foundation in Association with the Liederkranz Foundation Presents An Evening of Lieder & Song

The Gerda Lissner Foundation in association with the Liederkranz Foundation presented the 2018 Lieder/Song Vocal Competition Winners Concert. The event was held on Friday, November 2nd at the Liederkranz Foundation in New York City. The Gerda Lissner Foundation has long been a source of assistance and scholarships for young talented singers. Stephen De Maio President, Michael Fornabaio Vice President and Treasurer, Cornelia Beigel Secretary and Trustee, and Karl Michaelis and Barbara Ann Testa, Trustees who are a part of opera history. Steve De Maio introduced host Midge Woolsey and he received much applause after several months absence. Steve also introduced the gifted accompanist Arlene Shrut.

Dashuai Chen, Arlene Shrut, Rebecca Farley, Christine Lyons, Alice Chung, Justin Austin, Amanda Bottoms, Helena Brown, Xiaomeng Zhang, Hubert Zapiór & Midge Woolsey. Photo by Judy Pantano

Midge Woolsey, looking exuberant and joyful introduced the first singer, soprano Helena Brown, who sang “Hat dich die Liebe berührt” (If love has affected you) with depth from the heights with her beguiling serpentine soprano which envelopes the listener with its depth, richness, and power. She seemed equally at home in the upper and lower registers of her voice and this enhanced the text as smoothly as a trip at dusk on Schroon Lake in autumn. Ms. Brown can sing either Aida or Amneris – or both – lie in waiting for this talented young lady. She is versatile and has real style!  

Amanda Lynn Bottoms, mezzo soprano tugged at the heartstrings with “Kdyz mne stará matka zpívat ucívala” (“Songs my Mother taught me”) by Antonín Dvorák. Ms. Bottoms sang with such emotion following the rhythm of this song without overt sobbing, one could hear the passion and conviction in her tone. Many years ago my mother-in-law, Regina Zigman bought me a gift – it was an LP of legendary Spanish soprano Victoria de los Angeles. One of her selections was “Songs my Mother taught me.” It always brought tears to my eyes.”Ms. de los Angeles had a special poignant quality that Amanda Lynn Bottoms brought back with her lovely rendition.

Jane Shaulis & Joseph Gasperec (Opera Index)
Photo by Judy Pantano

Next was Rebecca Farley whose radiant soprano sang “Apparition” by Claude Debussy. Ms. Farley has a beautiful upper register, exotic tonality and an inner spirit that can lead to unlimited possibilities.

Alice Chung mezzo-soprano sang “George” by William Bolcom. Judy and I saw Bolcom’s passionate opera A View from the Bridge at the enterprising Vertical Player Repertory opera in their Court Street loft in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn. Ms. Chung sang it with insouciance, whimsical tone, good humor, strong dialogue, power and passion and carried us all away with this bedazzling piece wanting us all to hear more!  

Christine Lyons used her captivating soprano and sang this familiar song “Ständchen” by Franz Schubert with freshness, sentiment and a sprinkling of vocal stardust. The great Danish heldentenor Lauritz Melchior sang this to Esther Williams in the MGM musical Thrill of a Romance in 1944. It is so tender and melodic that it resonates in my mind from that film for over 70 years. Ms. Lyons has a rare power of expression plus a lustrous soprano that should carry her far.

Nino Pantano, Brian Hunter & Maestro Per Brevig. Photo by Judy Pantano

Part Two of the program began with baritone Xiaomeng Zhang from Shanghai, who sang “An die Leier” by Franz Schubert with an abundance of beautiful tone and whetted the appetite for more Schubert.

Tenor Dashuai Chen was introduced by the exuberant Midge Woolsey by his choice of singing an ITALIAN song, the well-known tenor selection “Mattinata” (“Morning”) written for Enrico Caruso by Ruggiero Leoncavallo, the composer of Pagliacci. Caruso made a recording of it with the composer at the piano on April 8, 1904, in Milan, and practically every tenor has sung it since. Ferruccio Tagliavini (1913-1995) made a heavenly recording of it in the early 1950’s and on the Voice of Firestone on early television. Tagliavini had a sweet lyric tenor and a resourceful top. Such songs as “Anema e Core” and countless others dazzled the public. I saw him at his return to the Metropolitan Opera in 1962 in an enchanting La Bohème and Elisir d’amore plus a concert at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. These legendary and iconic singers had instantly recognizable voices and personalities that endeared them to the public. That is what we hope for with this new group of talented singers. Mr. Chen sang in a delightful tenor with an Italianate edge emphasizing the high tenor notes that rang freely through the room. In Thrill of a Romance. MGM introduced Lauritz Melchior to its film audience with his face singing a few bars of “Mattinata.” Mr. Chen will not be forgotten since he was one of the great highlights of the evening. As recommended by Midge Woolsey, I googled Joan Sutherland and heard her, a woman, sing a brilliant and delightful “Mattinata” – thank you Midge!

Foreground Michael Fornabaio & Maestro Eve Queler. Photo by Judy Pantano

Baritone Justin Austin sang “Pace non Trovo” by Franz Liszt. Liszt was always torn between the boudoir and the monks robes and had a lot of passion in his works.” I find no peace” was the inner theme of this selection. A combination of brilliance and despair that had us mesmerized. Justin Austin is a singer of strength and passion. The brilliant accompaniment of pianist Arlene Shrut was the beat of Mr. Austin’s heart. Midge Woolsey, our radiant host exclaimed, “if I could ever be another person, I would be Arlene Shrut!” We second the motion, brava Arlene Shrut!

Arlene Shrut & Glenn Morton
Photo by Judy Pantano

Hubert Zapiór, Polish baritone, winner of the Gerda Lissner award for 2018 sang a song written by Polish patriot, President, and piano virtuoso “Polaly sie lzy me czyste” by Jan Paderewski. Mr. Zapiór is a baritone with strong high notes and a vocally congenial physicality. His voice was reassuring in its versatility from thrilling highs to burnished lows. I thought of the great Polish bass baritone Adamo Didur who sang during Caruso’s time. Google his “La Colunnia” also Google soprano Marcella Sembrich whose museum near Lake George at Bolton Landing will fill you with Polish opera pride.

Karl Michaelis, Michèle Classe, Gloria Gari,
Lud Mayleas & Anthony Classe. Photo by Judy Pantano

I was happy to be seated next to the MetOpera legend mezzo Rosalind Elias, who offered me a mint when something had me coughing. Thank you so much! We also saw Gloria Gari and Lud Mayleas from the Giulio Gari Foundation, Jane Shaulis, Joseph Gasperec, Murray Rosenthal and Philip Hagemann, all from Opera Index; Maestros Eve Queler and Per Brevig with his wife Berit, Export consultant Michèle and Anthony Classe, Alfred and Christine Palladino from the Columbus Club, Deborah Surdi, from the Martina Arroyo Foundation, Glenn Morton from Classic Lyric Arts, Brian Hunter from the Musicians Club of New York, Diana Corto from International Concerts, sculptor Dionisio Cimarelli, Don DiGrazia formerly from the Metropolitan Opera Tickets with wife Chee, and opera lovers Emily Hsiung and Reiko Osumi.

Jerry (Juergen) Stolt, Jane Shaulis, Murray Rosenthal, Philip Hagemann, Midge Woolsey, Joseph Gasperec, Nino Pantano. Photo by Judy Pantano

The delicious finger foods and wines were sumptuous and we returned to Brooklyn with happy musical memories. It was probably a taxi like vehicle but it was a brightly lit magical pumpkin taking us home from the ball!

Martina Arroyo Foundation Celebrates its 14th Annual Gala Anniversary

On the evening of Monday, October 29th, the Martina Arroyo Foundation celebrated its 14th Anniversary at the JW Marriott Essex House in New York City. The program honored Simon Estes, Metropolitan Opera bass-baritone and Rufus Wainwright, singer songwriter and composer, and Maestro Anton Coppola, conductor and composer who received the Michel Maurel Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Rufus Wainwright, Martina Arroyo, Anton Coppola & Simon Estes. Photo by Sean Smith

Martina Arroyo welcomed one and all and truly is a beacon of light for the promotion of young opera singers. “The mission of the Martina Arroyo Foundation is to prepare and counsel young singers in the interpretation of complete operatic roles for public performance.” This is accomplished through  Prelude to Performance which showcases the singers progress.

The Gala chair was Gary Spector, who spoke briefly and introduced the host for the evening, the iconic Nimet Habachy from WQXR radio whose honeyed speaking voice has charmed millions for decades.

Dr. Joan Taub, Nimet Habachy & Suzan Habachy
Photo by Judy Pantano

The first awardee was the great bass-baritone Simon Estes who hails from Centerville, Iowa and began his career in the 1960’s. He recalled his memories of iconic soprano Shirley Verrett and the charming, witty great Italian basso Cesare Siepi. Mr. Estes regretted not singing with Martina Arroyo. In earlier days on the rise, he recalls singing for 84 companies. His grandfather was a slave and Simon always used his grandfather’s love of the Church to enhance his belief that “justice is stronger than injustice.” Helping children and giving them spiritual nourishment makes him a messenger of good today. He teaches master classes throughout the country and currently is a professor at Iowa State University. I remember Simon Estes when I was a young man in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn and I loved the special richness and power of his voice. To me, he was always a pioneer and a hero. It was humbling to meet and greet the great Simon Estes.

The second awardee was Rufus Wainwright singer, songwriter and opera composer. He was introduced by musicologist Cori Ellison who admired  Mr. Wainwright’s love of opera and his work. I was surprised and inspired by his opera Prima Donna which evoked some of the best in Louise by Charpentier and Tosca by Puccini – but had its own distinct sound and momentum. His newest opera, Hadrian was favorably reviewed by The New York Times critic Anthony Tommasini. Mr. Wainwright, looking Mephistophelian in red including his shoes, told the audience of his talented singing parents and his boyhood in Toronto, Canada. “There were tenors aplenty” on the phonograph and he especially recalled the great Italian tenor Beniamino Gigli. Music was all around the house and opera gave them all harmonic happiness. He loved Giuseppe Verdi’s music. Wainwright’s enthusiasm and his friends were all there to lend support.

Soprano Maria Brea sang the wondrous aria “Depuis le jour” from Gustave Charpentier’s (1860-1956) Louise. Ms. Brea sang with a lovely mezza voce and rhapsodic full voice. She floated tones heaven bound and reached ecstatic vocal climaxes that dazzled and thrilled. Maestro Stephen Crawford caught all of the color and sparkling radiance of the music in his superb accompaniment.

The great Scottish-American soprano Mary Garden (1874-1967) who dazzled the French with herLouise in 1900 was the rage of Paris. Louise was a unique opera and composer Gustave Charpentier wrote a sequel called Julien but it never surpassed Louise. Enrico Caruso courted his American bride Dorothy in his Julien costume. Mary Garden made a haunting recording of “Depuis le jour” in 1926. As a young woman she lived on President Street in Brooklyn near Park Slope. I met her at The Brooklyn Academy of Music in 1951. She was in her late seventies and lecturing on her autobiography that was just published. In 1920, she became the head of the Chicago Opera. Her film of Thais made her even more notorious. She never sang as a member of the Metropolitan Opera but had a long career in Chicago and she did appear with Enrico Caruso in concert. I kissed her hand and years later Maria Jeritza’s hand. Two legendary divas and Martina is next, that’s for sure.

Soprano Maria Brea & Tenor WooYoung Yoon
Photo by Sean Smith

“O soave fanciulla” followed sung by soprano Maria Brea and tenor WooYoung Yoon. Puccini’s La Bohème never fails to captivate the listener but this particular moment was special. Judy and I honeymooned at Essex House in 1966 and to see and hear two such singers so rhapsodically entwined recalled the memory. Their voiced blended beautifully and Mr. Yoon was an ardent suitor and she equally so. They ended the duet arm in arm leaving the room with two rhapsodic high C’s with power and loving brio! Stephen Crawford’s accompaniment was like a full symphony of life and love!

The next performance was by tenor WooYoung Yoon. The familiar “Ah mes amis” from La Fille du Regiment which catapulted Luciano Pavarotti to fame with 9 high C’s in the early 1970’s at the Metropolitan Opera. Mr. Yoon has a sweet and vibrant tenor with good projection and even flow. He added embellishments to embellishments giving us a double thrill. His upper voice is manly and stratospheric and he seems very comfortable in those high altitudes. But that did not remove the “frisson” that makes this aria so exciting. One must “conquer” the 9 high C’s and that he did. Stephen Crawford ably accompanied Mr. Yoon and the thrill was brought forward with this partnership.

Maestro Anton Coppola now 101 years of age attended with his beloved wife Almerinda. We met them at the Columbus Club a few years before when he wrote a song for her, a former ballerina he married long ago. We also met Maestro Coppola at a Verdi Festival at the Casa Duse, where Joan Sutherland lived in Park Slope, Brooklyn. He was always a phenomenon and when asked how he has lived so long he replied, “Pasta Faggioli” (Spaghetti with beans). Bravo Maestro! Maestro Coppola was given the Michel Maurel award for Lifetime Achievement named after Martina’s beloved late husband.

Ellen Godfrey, Nino Pantano, Murray Rosenthal, Elaine Malbin
Janet Stovin & Philip Hagemann Photo by Judy Pantano

Maestro Coppola was given a mike and he addressed Martina Arroyo with some hilarious repartee in a loud clear voice. She responded with wit and wisdom and the audience in on the joke laughed heartily. In Coppola’s new finale for Puccini’s Turandot, Empress Turandot guesses Calaf’s name and he gets his head chopped off with the others. I personally don’t care for a “headless” Calaf but it suits the flavor of our times.

Robert Lombardo, Maestro Anton & Almerinda Coppola & Maestro Eve Queler. Photo by Judy Pantano

A superb dinner followed and much good talk. We chatted with Met mezzo Jane Shaulis, President of Opera Index, Murray Rosenthal treasurer and composer Philip Hagemann (Popular choral composition Fruitcake) and Janet Stovin who fondly recalled living close to Ebbets Field and the great Brooklyn Dodgers. Janet recalled Jackie Robinson’s ascendancy with the team of blessed memory. Former Met mezzo, the effervescent Nedda Casei, was with us as was her most charming friend Diane Gallagher.The debonair Robert Steiner and Faith Pleasanton were also at our table. It was so nice to see the talented soprano Victoria Miningham from the New York Grand Opera. We spoke of the great Maestro Vincent La Selva and his incomparable operas free every summer in Central Park. We discussed recipes with Paolo Petrini and Rigoletto with opera coach Robert Lombardo. Soprano Elaine Malbin still looking every inch the youthful soubrette, Maestro Eve Queler and Cavaliere Eddward Jackson, Met tenor Anthony Laciura and his wife Joel and writer chef Meche Kroop. I discussed Beniamino Gigli with Rufus Wainwright and friends and told him that I saw Gigli at his return and farewell at Carnegie Hall in 1955 when the 65 year old tenor sang his heart out with a dozen arias and another dozen songs from opera and his films, including Mamma and Quanno ‘a femmena vo’ where he did a “bump.” (No grind)

Nino Pantano Faith Pleasanton, Robert Steiner
Edward Jackson & Judy Pantano. Photo by Sean Smith

We thank Martina Arroyo, Deborah Surdi (From Sicilian Bensonhurst like me) and everyone who planned this glorious and wonderful event. Her father, the late Demetrio Arroyo, worked as a supervisor at the Brooklyn Navy Yard to help pay for his talented daughter and who today is the great Metropolitan Opera legend, pioneer and source of delight as a teacher and head of the Martina Arroyo Foundation. Her special award at the Kennedy Center Awards made us all proud. Brava!

Legendary Met Opera Soprano Martina Arroyo at the Kennedy Awards Center in 2013