Paley Center Presents Elaine Malbin as Suor Angelica with NBC Opera

Maestro Eve Queler with Composer Philip Hagemann. Photo by Judy Pantano

Once upon a time, lets say 1953, they had television executives who wanted to bring culture to a wider audience in America. “General” David  Sarnoff and Samuel Chotzinoff were two cases in point. In 1937, David Sarnoff created an orchestra to lure the just retired great conductor Arturo Toscanini (1867-1957). Toscanini then led the orchestra in a series of broadcasts and telecasts for the next 17 years. (1937-1954)

The NBC Opera was also formed to promote great operas in English. Their first telecast was Amahl and the Night Visitors composed by Gian-Carlo Menotti for television and the NBC Opera. It was an enormous success when performed on December 24,1951. Other operas were Madama Butterfly, Salome and a host of others. The NBC Opera toured America but was disbanded after a few years.

Today most television producers and executives get as glazed as a dunkin’ donut when anything that is not “hip hop “or rock is mentioned. Most opera productions allow outrageous “updates” and violence to fill their coffers if not the house with the tattoo and nose pierced sets. Anything sentimental or traditional is scoffed at or is not considered politically  correct! What a pity because I believe that even the most hard hearted skeptic could not weep at the dilemma of poor Sister Angelica.

WQXR host Robert Sherman with Reviewer Nino Pantano. Photo by Judy Pantano

The great composer and man of the theater, Giacomo Puccini had a sister who was a nun. The Puccini family were church organists and composers for generations. Suor Angelica was written in 1918 as part of Il Trittico a series of three short operas. Il Tabarro is a dramatic love triangle tragedy, Suor Angelica initially dismissed as a “weak” piece and the delightful comedy Gianni Schicchi. Suor Angelica has come up from behind and is gaining new admirers for its musical elegance and overwhelming drama.

Murray Rosenthal, Mark Rucker, Eve Queler, Nino Pantano, Nimet Habachy, Bill Ronayne, Ken Benson, Judy Pantano & Sadie Rucker

On the afternoon of Sunday, June 10th at the Paley Center located on West 52nd Street in New York City, a brief welcome and introduction was given by Associate Curator Rebecca Paller. She expressed her wonderment at the marvelous treatment given the NBC Opera done “live” with beautiful sets, excellent camera work, intimate shots and thrilling music by the orchestra which was unseen even by the singers. Ms. Paller singled out some special guests like legendary Met Opera soprano Elinor Ross, famed conductor Eve Queler and “practically everyone in  the audience!” Suor Angelica was aired in 1953 and repeated “live” in 1954.

Puccini’s Suor Angelica (Sister Angelica) takes place in Italy in 1680. Soprano Elaine Malbin, a young 21 year old Brooklyn born and raised was Suor Angelica. Sister Angelica’s sweetness and innocence prevailed and she was dutiful and resilient in her being. All the nuns were sworn to obedience and just once you wanted to hear “What do you do with a problem like Maria” from The Sound of Music. Suor Angelica gathers herbs for the nuns. Then there is a special visitor for her, her aunt. Sister Angelica was from a well to do family. She gave birth to a child and her family kept the child and they placed Sister Angelica in a convent. Her aunt, the Principessa (mezzo Winifred Heidt) is on a special mission and needs Sister Angelica to sign some papers dealing with property. Angelica queries about her child and is cruelly told that a few years back the child was ill and died of a fever. Angelica reaches out to the Principessa in her anguish but Zia (Aunt) steps back and prays, always remindful of the family disgrace wrought by Angelica. Ms. Heidt was riveting and flawless in her singing and acting. Her steely taut mezzo was symbolic of Hell’s wrath. Her exit left a chill in the room.

Soprano Elaine Malbin with daughter Amy & granddaughter Savannah. Photo by Judy Pantano

Suor Angelica is shocked by the news and sings “Senza Mamma” (without a Mother) ending on a high note that is from her heart to God. She mixes some poisonous herbs and takes them. In her delirium, she denounces herself for taking her own life which means Hell but as she dies, the Virgin Mary appears and lifts her arms in forgiveness and her child welcomes her to heaven.

Elaine Malbin was intense, her emotion profound, not one gesture wasted, her voice a laser of silver and gold as intense as a forger of steel. The final scene had me in tears, recalling my boyhood when things like the Madonna was so venerated by my Sicilian family. The Mother Superior Abbess (soprano Virginia Viney) was vivid and authoritative, but turned a blind eye when the nuns were eating sweets. All of the nuns sang with passion and fervor and were each and every one a gem. The Zia Principessa was like the ghost of Christmas Future in Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. She was a heartless unforgiving spectre. turning her back on Angelica, showing punishment without mercy – a frightening figure, brilliantly portrayed and sung in a resplendent mezzo.

Peter Herman Adler was the most sensitive conductor and Kurt Browning the superb director. The producer was Samuel Chotzinoff with the Symphony of the Air Orchestra and the NBC Opera chorus. The beautiful sets were by William Molyneux. The English translations were by Townsend Brewster. When the lights were on again, on stage there was Elaine Malbin, looking remarkably young and given a long ovation. The eloquent and knowledgeable Robert Sherman from WQXR (The Listening Room) had a Question and Answer session with Ms. Malbin. She thanked her teachers in P.S. 234 in Brooklyn for her career. One teacher in particular heard her singing and made her join the chorus.

Soprano Elaine Malbin, with Janet Stovin & Murray Rosenthal from Opera Index. Photo by Judy Pantano

Ms. Malbin sang “Voi lo sapete Mamma” from Cavalleria Rusticana at age 14 and sang with the great Viennese tenor Richard Tauber while still in her teens. When asked by conductor Wilfrid Pelletier where she found such adult emotion at so tender an age she said, “I just felt it through the music – that’s all!”

An early La Traviata with Lawrence Tibbett as Germont and a brief study at the Stella Adler acting studio and the Stanislavsky method which she briefly used. But in reality it was just something she possessed and did. Elaine Malbin was given one weeks notice to learn the part and you could not see the conductor or orchestra. It was all savvy, Brooklyn grit and her own special gifts that allowed her not only to survive bur thrive. She also mentioned her Broadway play My Darlin’ Aida where she sang Aida six times a week. Rudolph Bing warned her “it will ruin your voice” but it never did. She sang at New York City Opera and did coach with Brooklyn’s Beverly Sills teacher Estelle Liebling. When the erudite Robert Sherman asked Elaine Malbin about her career losing its momentum, she proudly introduced her daughter Amy and grand daughter Savannah!

We then went from the Spielberg film room to the main room downstairs. A special Tony Bennett exhibit was on display showing his masterful paintings of people and places. We were pleased to chat with opera manager Ken Benson, conductor pioneer Eve Queler, Met Verdi baritone Mark Rucker and his wife Sadie from the Martina Arroyo Foundation’s Prelude to Performance, WQXR famed hosts Robert Sherman and Nimet Habachy, Opera Index treasurer Murray Rosenthal, Vice Presidents Philip Hagemann and Janet Stovin all from Opera Index. Murray Rosenthal requested this homage for Elaine Malbin and also presented the voices of several legendary sopranos on video: Callas, Caballe and Stratas all singing their interpretation of the famous “O Mio Babbino Caro” from Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi. 

Dramatic soprano Elinor Ross was enjoying the party as was author Luna Kaufmann, Gloria Gari, from the Giulio Gari Foundation and Bill Ronayne from the Mario Lanza Society. Ronayne reminded us that Elaine Malbin made two recordings with Mario Lanza back in 1950 for the film album The Toast of New Orleans.

Reviewer Nino Pantano with Associate Curator Rebecca Paller. Photo by Judy Pantano

Unfortunately legendary soprano and “founder of the feast” Martina Arroyo could not attend but sent regrets and a reminder that the Martina Arroyo Foundation will present the young awardee singers in Puccini’s Suor Angelica and Gianni Schicchi and Bizet’s Carmen in early July at the Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College. The playhouse is named after the great funny man Danny Kaye and his wife Sylvia Fine who were both Brooklynites. Martina Arroyo’s father Demetrio supported young Martina’s musical career as an engineer at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Can you imagine an America where such magnificent cultural television once reigned? Giving voice to that significant minority-the lovers of classical music and opera? Television executives who respected the taste of their viewers – even if it was 10 million instead of 100 million? Thank you Martina Arroyo in absentia and Elaine Malbin. You brought back the thrill!

The Regina Opera Presents An Amusing L’Elisir d’Amore

Adina (Hannah Stone, center left) & Belcore (Peter Hakjoon Kim, center right) among a group of villagers. Photo by George Schowerer

On the afternoon of Saturday, May 20th, the Regina Opera concluded its 47th season with the charming comedy L’Elisir d’Amore. One more performance with alternate cast the next day! The great composer Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848) wrote many tragedies such as Lucia di Lammermoor, but his comedies La fille du Regiment, Don Pasquale and L’Elisir d’Amore are still a source of great delight. Donizetti was a prolific composer and a master of melody. The librettist was Italian poet and scholar Felice Romani who wrote many librettos for composers Donizetti and Bellini.

L’Elisir d’Amore premiered in Milan on May 12, 1832 and has been a favorite ever since. On a sad note, on December 11, 1920, the great tenor Enrico Caruso sang Nemorino at the Brooklyn Academy of Music. (BAM) He suffered a throat hemorrhage and the curtain came down after the first act. Incredibly Caruso sang three times more at the Metropolitan Opera in great pain. His last performance was in La Juive the following December 24th. He died on August 2, 1921 at the age 48, after a lingering illness.

Dr. Dulcamara (Luis Alvarado, center with basket) shows his potions to a group of villagers. Photo by George Schowerer

At Regina Opera, Principal conductor Maestro Gregory Ortega stepped up to the podium and the performance began. After the overture, the curtain rose to reveal a bright rustic inn and floral scene with Adina reading a book and a group of peasants nearby.

Nemorino lovingly gazed at Adina and sang “Quanto è bella, quanto è cara” about how beautiful and how dear she is. Lyric tenor Ivan Rivera, was the Nemorino for this performance. Mr. Rivera, born in Puerto Rico, has an endearing boyish appearance, is very mobile and resembles a young Cantinflas. (A brilliant Mexican film comedian) Rivera was perfect as the runt of the litter, the foil and fool, his head besot with thoughts of Adina who seemed to be totally out of his reach. He is the gnat that one slaps, a speck of dust in the eye of his unattainable beloved. Nemorino’s singing of “Quanto è bella” showed a somewhat different approach to singing, almost between his teeth-but the sound was that of a true tenore di grazie, of old, with a haunting vibrato and a full top. His interplay with Adina was most affecting and his singing of the great aria “Una furtiva lagrima” was one of the highlights of the performance. His diminuendos were exceptional, his spinning of the tone and heartfelt passages were moving. Rivera’s final cadenza, with fading and diminishing of the tone, was a marvel and his swelling of the note just before the conclusion was magical. Rivera’s comic acting with the so called “elixir” was great fun, his interplay with Belcore was like Lt. Colombo-always showing up and bothering, cloying and annoying! The finale, where he finally wins Adina’s heart, was absolute triumph and joy! A wonderful performance!


Dr. Dulcamara (Luis Alvarado, right) & Nemorino (Ivan Rivera, left). Photo by George Schowerer

Adina, a wealthy young lady, was enchantingly played by Hannah Stone whose attractive persona, lovely soprano and understated and subtle behavior made for an enchanting Adina. Her rouladescadenzas and stratospheric high notes throughout the performance made her the perfect match for her heartsick swain. Ms. Stone’s describing the story of Tristan and Isolde’s magic love potion to the peasants was dream worthy. Her sweet saucy soprano, was perfect in this role. There was exuberance as she hit her high notes with triumph in her duet with Dulcamara, “The Gondoliera and the Senator”, which was sung with delicious whimsy and abandon! Ms. Stone’s stunning singing of “Prendi, per me sei libero” with its cadenzas and vocal fireworks in the second act showed her artful best. It was a “tour de force” that was dazzling! The finale with she and Nemorino finally kissing as one made for much happiness.

Sergeant Belcore was brilliantly sung and acted by Peter Hakjoon Kim. Mr. Kim, a Regina Opera favorite, used his strong flexible baritone well – ensuring us that this braggadocio charmer would eventually get his comeuppance by the “dim-witted” peasant Nemorino. “In ciei, ingrazio, o babbino”  was sung with such scorn that it’s no wonder Belcore didn’t box Nemorino’s ears, or “bash his head” as promised. Kim’s robust singing with Nemorino in their duet “Venti Scudi” was unctuous and deliciously droll. Mr. Kim sang some great cadenzas and hit a few impressive high notes with great ease and this vainglorious “villain” loses his fiancée (and almost bride) Adina to his simpleton rival, only to march off with Adina’s friend Giannetta, his newest military “conquest.”

Belcore (Peter Hakjoon Kim, first row far right) & his fiancée Adina (Hannah Stone, to his right) with a group of villagers. Nemorino (Ivan Rivera, far left). Photo by George Schowerer

Dulcamara, a traveling “doctor”, was in the able hands of Luis Alvarado, whose generous basso-buffo ensured us of a strong performance. (I am always amazed at all the “Dulcamara’s” selling their magical cures on the Internet). After much pomp and trumpetry with descriptions of a golden coach, Dr. Dulcamara arrived with his assistant, riding a red bicycle! I recall at the old Met, the great 300 pound basso-buffo (later movie star) Salvatore Baccaloni, arriving in a balloon! Dulcamara’s singing of “Udite, udite o rustici” was sung with relish as he describes the various “cures” of his “magic elixir” warts, gone! widows rejuvenated! humps? gone! rheumatism, banished! A miracle elixir (cheap Bordeaux wine).

Alvarado’s comical singing of “The Gondoliera and the Senator,” with Adina at her “wedding” to Sergeant Belcore,” Io son ricco e tu sei bella” was most amusing. Alvarado  was a very noteworthy Dulcamara and his “patter singing” was first rate. The finale with his singing “Ei corregge ogni difetto” with chorus and company was an absolute delight.

Sharon Cheng was a most charming Giannetta with a piquant pretty soprano and a gleeful countenance.

Dr. Dulcamara (Luis Alvarado) & Adina (Hannah Stone). Photo by Sabrina Palladino

Sarah Barringer was the “quicker picker upper” as the erstwhile assistant to Dr. Dulcamara.

The chorus was in excellent form and I loved when they crossed themselves perpetually and with some glee, when they heard that Nemorino’s uncle had passed away and left him a fortune. Beloved chorister Cathy Greco’s crossing herself with such wide eyed sincerity with the others was notable. The colorful ensemble consisted of Valentine Baron, Susanna Booth, Justine D’Souza, Thomas Geib, Wayne Olsen, Raffaele Rosato, Samantha DiCapio and Cassandra Santiago.

The costumes by Marcia C. Kresge were perfect-from Adina’s rustic and lovely dresses to the peasants garb, Dr. Dulcamara’s pompous outfit, Nemorino’s somewhat threadbare outfits, and the dazzling red uniforms of Sergeant Belcore and his troop.

The Principal Conductor and Music Director, the ingenious Maestro Gregory Ortega led a strong unified and glowing performance. The 34 excellent musicians followed his invigorating beat which was truly blended to this joyous tuneful score by Gaetano Donizetti. Kudos to Jonathon Nelson on the keyboard for the parlando passages. The trumpet heralding the arrival of Dr. Dulcamara was adroitly played by Hugh Ash.


Nemorino (Ivan Rivera) & Belcore (Peter Hakjoon Kim). Photo by Sabrina Palladino

Sam Themer and Milan Rakic’s make up was flawless and Linda Cantoni’s super titles were invaluable.

The sets were beautiful and rustic, with garlands of flowers, overhanging vines, an open doorway with verdant outside, the intimacy of a small taverna and an elaborate wedding feast replete with food and fun. The versatile Wayne Olsen’s set graphics and principal flutist and set artist Richard Paratley’s painted backdrop and other artistic touches were truly admirable.

The mournful bassoon solo by Stephen Rudman in “Una furtive lagrima” deserves special mention.

Lastly, the one who infused this performance of L’Elisir d’amore with a special life is Stage Director and Set Designer Linda Lehr. Ms. Lehr’s balancing the various protagonists, freezing of images, making the action so wonderfully fluid and special whimsical touches from Belcore’s blustering to Nemorino’s “no room at the inn” gloom and doom and packaging it all into a fine surprise with a perfect gift wrap is a miracle. Dr. Dulcamara’s arrival after so much heralding, not in a golden coach but instead on a red bicycle was like the midget clowns at the circus following the giants.

We thank the indefatigable Francine Garber-Cohen, Producer and President, Joe Delfausse, Marlena Ventimiglia, Elena Jannicelli-Sandella and all the volunteers for always greeting one and all as they arrive for an afternoon of splendid opera at Brooklyn’s “crown jewel,” The Regina Opera.

Afterwards we reenacted the sumptuous dinner scene by dining at La Casa Vieja, a Mexican restaurant nearby where Lourdes Peña and company hosted us very well indeed!

See you next season – Regina’s 48th!

 

 

 

Dr. Robert Campbell & Cesare Santeramo Honored at Opera Index Spring Concert & Luncheon

Standing: Honoree Cesare Santeramo, Jane Shaulis & Joseph Gasperec-Opera Index. Seated: Sachi Liebergesell-Licia Albanese-Puccini Fdn. & Honoree Dr. Robert Campbell. Photo by Judy Pantano

The afternoon of Sunday, May 7th was a frantic one for New York and the world. The five boroughs were part of a super congesting bicycle marathon, street fairs were aplenty, France was having a controversial election and mayhem prevailed-but not at The JW Marriott Essex House in New York City. Here, all was music, harmony, peace and love. Two magnificent and important “givers” were honored and beautiful young voices prevailed with generous portions of food and wine!

Famed Metropolitan Opera mezzo-soprano Jane Shaulis is the President of Opera Index which has been giving awards to young promising singers for 35 years. She proudly gave monetary statistics from Opera Index’s generous patrons and members that were impressive indeed! Ms. Shaulis singled out former Opera Index awardee soprano Jennifer Rowley whose recent performance at The Metropolitan Opera in Cyrano (Roxanne) won the highest praise from the critics.

Then with the excellent accompanist Michael Fennelly at the piano, the concert began.

Andrés Moreno Garcia started the concert with a fervent performance of “Salut! Demeure chaste et pure” from Gounod’s Faust. Moreno’s robust tenor voice had Italianate flair and French refinement. Moreno commands attention with his polished squillo, fine shading and a beautifully hit high C with a ravishing diminuendo which conjured up an image of his beloved Marguerite. Moreno showed us how to do this aria with ease.

Pianist Michael Fennelly & Singers Kidon Choi, Andrés Moreno Garcia, Amanda Lynn Bottoms,
Vartan Gabrielian & Opera Index President Jane Shaulis. Photo by Judy Pantano

Kidon Choi sang the popular “Il Balen” from Il Trovatore by Giuseppe Verdi. Having heard the great American baritone Leonard Warren sing this aria, I dish out praise with extreme caution. Mr. Choi is the possessor of a large baritone voice with some fine shading and an impressive top. Di Luna is not a nice character but Verdi infused Di Luna’s love for Leonora’s aria with some of the most tender and sublime melodies ever. Mr Choi used his voice well and negotiated the passages with eagerness. Leonard Warren, looking down, is rooting for Choi and so are we!

Opera Index VP Philip Hagemann with David & Barbara Bender From Career Bridges. Photo by Judy Pantano

Amanda Lynn Bottoms in red shoes was a sultry Carmen. Her warm Amaretto mezzo made the “Habanera” from Carmen the sexy moment it should be. Ms. Bottoms did not over exaggerate or over act. She was as Carmen should be, sleek, stalking and deadly as a

rattlesnake. We hope she will grace the world’s stages soon!

Angela Vallone the soprano scheduled could not attend. However Vartan Gabrielian, bass-baritone ably filled the void with the glorious singing of Aleko’s song from Rachmaninoff’s opera Aleko! This tall imposing bass-baritone showed his inner Boris Godunov with his excellent Russian diction and emoting. Michael Fennelly’s powerhouse playing in this music took us to heavenly heights!

An encore followed with Andrés Moreno Garcia and Kidon Choi singing “O Mimì tu più non torni” from Puccini’s La Bohème. Mr. Garcia’s throbbing tenor and Mr Choi’s generous baritone went to the core of Rodolfo and Marcello’s plight – an unbearable life without their sweethearts.

Opera Index VP Janet Stovin & Mezzo-Soprano Nedda Cassei. Photo by Judy Pantano

To break the La Bohème mood of nostalgic sadness, Jane Shaulis regaled us with a Doctor-Patient song called The Physician by Cole Porter that was most amusing to hear. The doctor only sees her as a patient, never as a love interest or a goddess! Ms. Shaulis’s glorious mezzo and humorous gestures made for some wonderfully funny moments!

The two honorees were given a standing, cheering ovation by the crowd and Dr. Robert Campbell, looking quite chipper, was lovingly assisted to the podium. Dr. Campbell, a noted psychiatrist, was a clinical professor of Psychiatry at Cornell Weill Medical College and is Medical Director Emeritus of the New York Gracie Square Hospital in NYC. He is best known for Campbell’s Psychiatric Dictionary now in its 9th edition by Oxford University Press. He is a Knight of the Orthodox Order of St. John Russian Grand Priory. He has been a member of the boards of the Opera Orchestra of New York, Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation and the Ferro International Program for Operatic Scholars and Students. There is a photo in lobby of Robert Campbell and Cesare Santeramo with Princess Grace of Monaco that was breathtaking! Dr. Campbell accepted his award with a humble and witty speech in which he summarized the joys of living and the joys of giving!

Opera Index Treasurer Murray Rosenthal & Career Bridges Founder David Bender. Photo by Judy Pantano

Cesare Santeramo, was born in Newark, New Jersey and started singing in the boys chorus of his church when he was six years old. His first attended opera at the Met was La Traviata with beloved diva Licia Albanese and the great baritone Robert Merrill. He attended every Saturday performance until he was drafted into the Army. He sang with the Second Army Major Command Chorus which included concerts with Risë Stevens and appearances on the Ed Sullivan show. Santeramo had a successful singing career with the New Jersey Opera singing 15 lead roles over 25 years with the company including Alfredo in La Traviata with Licia Albanese. There is a photo of Santeramo in the lobby as Pinkerton. Santeramo was a board member of the Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation for 19 years. At the same time, he was Director of Conference Management and Food Services for AT&T. Santeramo is a Chancellor of of the Orthodox Order of St. John Russian Grand Priory.

Dr. Campbell and Mr. Santeramo have generously created an annual award for Opera Index with many past winners to the present. Their generosity is boundless. Cesare Santeramo and Dr. Robert Campbell are “Renaissance men” who by virtue of their talents and skills also season the world with elegance, style and grace (and to end it poetically), they make the world a better place!

Mr. Santeramo, looking the epitome of chic, graciously accepted the award with praise for his parents, for his lifelong friend Dr. Robert Campbell, for Licia Albanese and to the glorious art of opera.

Seated: Reviewer Nino Pantano & Soprano Lucine Amara. Standing: Opera Exposures Dwight Owsley, Computers George Voorhis & Opera Manager Ken Benson. Photo by Judy Pantano

In the star studded crowd were Met opera legends, soprano Elinor Ross, mezzo-soprano Nedda Cassei and long time Met soprano Lucine Amara. Ms. Amara, vibrant and witty at age 92 regaled us with many tales of the Metropolitan Opera in the halcyon Bing era and beyond. So many legendary comrades like basso Cesare Siepi who she said, loved playing practical jokes onstage, Jan Peerce short in stature but a splendid musician. Ms. Amara should write a book about her adventures in the opera world! Lucine Amara is a proud Armenian American and the Armenian bass-baritone Vartan Gabrielian came to our table to chat with her and express his admiration. New York City Opera soprano Elaine Malbin was ever the soubrette in a flaming red dress and told us of her days with the NBC TV opera. Sachi Liebergesell who is President of the Licia Albanese-Puccini Foundation is among the admirers of the two honorees. It was so nice to see her among the glitterati.

It was great to chat with Murray Rosenthal, Secretary of Opera Index and Vice President and composer Philip Hagemann whose opera Ruth was given at at the Brooklyn Music School around the corner from the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM) the night before. Janet Stovin, also Vice President of Opera Index, vividly recalled her childhood in the shadow of Ebbets Field, Bill Ronayne from the Brooklyn based Mario Lanza Society, Maestro Stephen Phebus and Linda Howes, pillars of Opera Index, the sparkling Barbara Meister-Bender and David Bender from Career Bridges, Duane Prinz from Teatro Grattacielo, Brooklyn born opera manager Ken Benson and computer whiz and concert maven George Voorhis and the dashing Dwight Owsley from Opera Exposures. Helen Doctorow, Jolana Blau and author Luna Kaufman lent their vital presence. We recall their valuable work at the Elysium-Between Two Continents headed by Gregorij von Leïtis and Michael Lahr, who are presenting many events in Germany and Europe this summer. Both Dr. Robert Campbell and Cesare Santeramo were recently honored with the Erwin Piscator Award from Elysium at the Lotos Club in New York City.

Edward Jackson, poet-Cavaliere lent his ebullient persona to the mix and the radiant Maestro Eve Queler who gave so many magical opera concerts with the Opera Orchestra of New York. We said a fond farewell at the door to Opera Index President Jane Shaulis and her spouse Joseph Gasperec who help make Opera Index the perfect place to host young singers.

Another great party for a truly worthwhile cause. All the best to our gallant Knights – Dr. Robert Campbell and Cavaliere Cesare Santeramo for their many accomplishments and deserved honors!